Invention Ideas - How To Prototypes Work

Drag to rearrange sections
Rich Text Content

 

When it comes to capitalising off your invention ideas, often the first step is legally establishing ownership rights to the idea. Without this, you will never benefit financially from your invention; you must first have the proof that proves that you were first to invent your idea. This is done in the form of a patent. A patent provides full legal rights and InventHelp protections not only to the inventor but also to any company or individual who uses the invention before you.

Patent rights to stop others from using your invention in any way that infringes on your patent rights. Patents can be very costly and time-consuming to obtain so it is often recommended that an invention is Protected under a patent before it is marketed. Once you have a patent in place you can begin marketing and generating business using your new invention. If you decide to market an invention prior to having it secured then you will be infringing the rights of the patent. This means that you will need to pay substantial fines or risk a permanent loss of any profits from the sale.

The problem is that many inventors wait to pursue their invention ideas because they believe that their ideas are too simple or complicated for the average person to make. While some of these products were very complex, such as the telephone, others were relatively simple, such as the washing machine. Other than the obvious reason that a better product does not necessarily translate into greater profits, what type of business would you rather be in if you waited until you had the patent rights so that you could patent your idea? Or, what type of business would you rather be in if you patent your idea but were unable to successfully market it due to the fact that others could legally do what you did?

The reason that we say gibberish is that a prototype is essential when it comes to patenting invention ideas. In the case of the washing machine example, an invention or breakthrough was made and the washing machine company waited until they got the patent so that they could mass produce the product. However, since the washing machine company waited until after they got the patent, no one else could mass produce the same product. If they had started their business manufacturing the product before the patent was granted, then they could have been in violation of the patent. So, when you receive an invention you should never rush to file the patent right away.

In the past, we would describe many of these invention ideas as being too simple because they were easy to make. The problem is that the laws of physics state that it is impossible to create something, only modify it. While it may be true that you can change physical states of objects, you cannot change the chemical makeup of the object, only create InventHelp different variations on those objects. As long as you do not introduce an additional factor which is outside of the laws of physics, then all of the ideas that we call 'innovations' are actually patentable. Even if you have a couple of extremely simple, but innovative ideas, it may still be worth filing for a patent because a competitor could conceivably come up with an even better idea while you're stuck chasing your tail.

One of the biggest problems that inventors face is coming up with a good idea. There are many factors that can derail a new invention. For example, there could be a competitor with a product that looks exactly like your invention, but it doesn't perform nearly as well, or it performs the same functions, but does it in a different way. One other example could be that an inventor comes up with an idea for a new invention, but nobody else has thought of it before. After all, an invention can take months or years to develop and be tried in a real setting, where it can be tested by actual people using products that consumers use every day. Therefore, the idea might be extremely clever, but unless it has been tried in an actual setting, there is really no way to tell whether it is a good one or not.

This is why so many inventors work hard to bring a new invention idea to the public. The goal of a Patent examiner is to make sure that the idea is actually worth the investment of time and money and that it will advance the progression of knowledge. The patent examiner will look at whether the invention is inventive and shows that it would result in new InventHelp and beneficial ways to the people who use the product. Often, an invention will go through several versions before it is finally patented, and the patenting process is a step in the patenting process.

Before you bring a new invention idea to market, it is important that you find a qualified patent attorney who can work with you to determine whether the idea is actually eligible for a patent or not. If it is not eligible for a patent, then there are a number of steps that can be taken to come up with the needed prototype. For example, some inventors may choose to build a simple prototype in their home using materials that are readily available from their local hardware store. Other inventors may choose to purchase components and create a fully working prototype from scratch.

rich_text    
Drag to rearrange sections
Rich Text Content
rich_text    

Page Comments